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"It's not for you to know, but for you to weep and wonder/When the death of your civilization precedes you."

--Neko Case

"The insane are always mere guests on earth, eternal strangers carrying around broken decalogues that they cannot read."

— F. Scott Fitzgerald

"We are accidents/Waiting to happen."

--Radiohead

Archive

Apr
7th
Mon
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"What season are you?"

He was silent for the space of three sips of whiskey.

"Fall," he said. "Fall in Nebraska, which is all silver and gold; silver of frost, gold of Halloween pumpkins in backyards and yellow tomatoes on the vine and bare fields of corn stubble and a yellow edge to the horizon under the purple snow clouds that come down from the Dakotas. A fall that is the cold of evenings when you make a fire and your whiskey catches the light and the heat of it, that is just like the line in the song about when the wind comes whistlin’ down the plain, and gets into the eaves and you hear the roof shingles rattle, but you’re in no hurry to worry about them, not just yet."

My God, Gaby thought, I am about to have sex with a Frank Capra movie.

— Ian McDonald, Evolution’s Shore
Mar
15th
Sat
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Tell someone he’s a Nazi long enough, and he may just become one, just for the hell of it and as a way of saying fuck you to the powers-that-be.
— Alexander Cockburn, A Colossal Wreck: A Road Trip Through Political Scandal, Corruption, And American Culture
Mar
14th
Fri
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“Whenever I feel depressed and overwhelmed, I feel the urge to shout to the world the anguish of my soul, the torments I’ve experienced, all my sorrows—but no one wants to hear about them. Then a good man comes along who portrays all my suffering in his films, and I can go see them over and over again. They show the evil faces of those who trade on others, the rich who pay no attention to the simple material needs of the poor.”
Hossein Sabzian in Close-up (Kiarostami, 1990).

“Whenever I feel depressed and overwhelmed, I feel the urge to shout to the world the anguish of my soul, the torments I’ve experienced, all my sorrows—but no one wants to hear about them. Then a good man comes along who portrays all my suffering in his films, and I can go see them over and over again. They show the evil faces of those who trade on others, the rich who pay no attention to the simple material needs of the poor.”

Hossein Sabzian in Close-up (Kiarostami, 1990).

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A couple of weeks ago, out of nowhere (I hadn’t heard from him for nearly a year), my dad emailed me to ask if I knew anything about a Lewis & Clark comic book, and where he could find back issues. (This from a man who always regarded comics with disdain, if not contempt.) The comic book is a horror fantasy in which the Lewis & Clark expedition encounters plant zombies and buffalo centaurs, among other monstrous entities. The series has become quite popular, with issues selling out, and a high demand for second and third printings of the first two issues. I sent him the first three issues, and this was his reaction:Not too sure about this ‘comic’. The guys that started it are at least creative, but other than that, not very entertaining. I think I expected something more humorous or at least paralleling fact. Actually, I though it was pretty trashy; think I’ll stick to the Stephen Ambrose version.By contrast, I’ve found the series to be highly amusing and entertaining. Knowing that my dad thinks this series is “trashy” only enhances my appreciation of it. Meanwhile, the lonesome wind continues to moan across the vast desert landscape between a father and son. <insert coyote howl>

A couple of weeks ago, out of nowhere (I hadn’t heard from him for nearly a year), my dad emailed me to ask if I knew anything about a Lewis & Clark comic book, and where he could find back issues. (This from a man who always regarded comics with disdain, if not contempt.) The comic book is a horror fantasy in which the Lewis & Clark expedition encounters plant zombies and buffalo centaurs, among other monstrous entities. The series has become quite popular, with issues selling out, and a high demand for second and third printings of the first two issues. 

I sent him the first three issues, and this was his reaction:

Not too sure about this ‘comic’. The guys that started it are at least creative, but other than that, not very entertaining. I think I expected something more humorous or at least paralleling fact. Actually, I though it was pretty trashy; think I’ll stick to the Stephen Ambrose version.

By contrast, I’ve found the series to be highly amusing and entertaining. Knowing that my dad thinks this series is “trashy” only enhances my appreciation of it. Meanwhile, the lonesome wind continues to moan across the vast desert landscape between a father and son. <insert coyote howl>

Mar
11th
Tue
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Mar
9th
Sun
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Mixed feelings about literature — the desire to annex its virtues while simultaneously belittling them — are typical of our culture today, which doesn’t know quite how to deal with an art form, like the novel, that is both democratic and demanding.
— Adam Kirsch, “Are the new ‘golden age’ TV shows the new novels?”, The New York Times Book Review, 2 March 2014.
Mar
7th
Fri
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"Nerd-droids," from Star Wars 80&#8217;s High School, Denis Medri.
Mar
4th
Tue
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"His brain was teeming with questions and ideas and yes, hope again. There was food to be found, water, clothing, shelter. And, most important, life. Who knew? It might be, it just might be there."
&#8212;Richard Matheson, The Incredible Shrinking Man.
Image via Astronomy Picture of the Day

"His brain was teeming with questions and ideas and yes, hope again. There was food to be found, water, clothing, shelter. And, most important, life. Who knew? It might be, it just might be there."

—Richard Matheson, The Incredible Shrinking Man.

Image via Astronomy Picture of the Day

Mar
3rd
Mon
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There is no group therapy or psychiatry or community social services for the child who must cope with the thing under the bed or in the cellar every night, the thing which leers and capers and threatens just beyond the point where vision will reach. The same lonely battle must be fought night after night and the only cure is the eventual ossification of the imaginary faculties, and this is called adulthood.
— Stephen King, 'Salem's Lot.
Mar
2nd
Sun
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Genesis 19:32: &#8220;Come, let us make our father drink wine, and we will lie with him, that we may preserve seed of our father.&#8221;
What a brilliantly horrific portrait of an apocalypse.
Lucas van Leyden, Lot and his Daughters (c.1521)

Genesis 19:32: “Come, let us make our father drink wine, and we will lie with him, that we may preserve seed of our father.”

What a brilliantly horrific portrait of an apocalypse.

Lucas van Leyden, Lot and his Daughters (c.1521)